Thick Brush Stroke

Food You Should Not Dehydrate 

Dehydrating food is one of the easiest and most useful methods for preserving and storing food long-term.  It also gives you the opportunity to add some variety to your food stockpile.

Although dehydrating food might seem like an all-encompassing solution for food storage, it has certain limitations. Specifically, any food with a lot of fat will be very difficult to properly dehydrate, and won’t last more than a few weeks in your pantry.

WHY CAN’T YOU DEHYDRATE EVERY FOOD?

FOOD YOU SHOULD NOT DEHYDRATE

> DAIRY PRODUCTS > NUTS > OLIVES > CONDIMENTS > AVOCADOS > FATTY MEATS > EGGS

DAIRY PRODUCTS

Butter, milk, and cheese should all be avoided when it comes to dehydrating. The high-fat content of cheese and butter makes it a lot of work to dehydrate, only to go rancid very quickly.

NUTS

When dehydrated, nuts lose a significant amount of their nutritional value and actually lowers their shelf life.  It would be pointless to dehydrate nuts for long term storage. Just freeze them in an airtight container.

OLIVES

If you really wanted to, you could dehydrate olives, but the taste isn’t worth it. You wouldn’t necessarily get food poisoning or anything, but the process removes a lot of nutrients and turns the olives into a bizarre-tasting mush.

CONDIMENTS

Avoid dehydrating store-bought condiments or sauces, even if you really want your favorite BBQ sauce added to your long-term food supply and food storage.

AVOCADOS

Since people dehydrate almost every fruit and vegetable, you might think avocados work too. Unfortunately, they don’t. The high content of good fats that make avocados a superfood also makes them useless to dehydrate.